Origin of yarn: COBURG FOX SHEEP

COBURG FOX SHEEP
Until the 19th century, this old breed of landsheep resided in large numbers in the mountainous regions of Central Europe. But before the 2nd World War, it became nearly extinct. Luckily, for the continued existence of the breed, a man named Otto Stritzel noticed the extraordinary properties of the Fox Sheep's fleece, since he was looking for characteristic features in order to produce a fine tweed fabric, matching the English production in quality. He started his breeding program in 1943 with 30 sheep. It was he who brought the attention again to the public's eye. In 1966, the COBURG FOX SHEEP was recognized as a proper breed by the German Agricultural Association. Today, with close to 4000 registered sheep throughout Germany, the breed is no longer counted among the endangered ones anymore, but its survival remains vulnerable and close surveillance is still necessary.

The COBURG FOX SHEEP is a medium size, uncomplicated sheep. Females and males are polled, with an approximate weight of 175 to 220 lbs. for the rams and 120 to 175 lbs. for the ewes. Their height is about 24 to 28 inches. The head is noble looking sometimes with a slight Roman nose and long ears. They are appreciated for their tasteful and tender meat. The particularity of the COBURG FOX SHEEP is that the lambs are born in a rich, reddish, chestnut-brown color and then gradually turn into a lovely cream color within the first 15 months. Some reddish, slightly coarser hair is evenly distributed throughout the fleece. However, it is not considered a dual coated breed.

We call the fleece of the COBURG FOX SHEEP the "Golden Fleece". The fiber is of medium to long length with a nice crimp and a lovely luster. Their head and legs are without wool and keep the reddish-brown color.

A few facts:
Today mostly found in: Germany, some in adjacent countries
Weight of fleece: 6,6 - 11,0 lbs (3,0 to 5,0 kg)
Micron Count: 30μm to 34μm
Staple length: medium to long